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(Amend­ments I to X inclu­sive, pop­u­larly known as the Bill of Rights, were pro­posed and sent to the states by the first ses­sion of the First Con­gress. They were rat­i­fied Dec. 15, 1791.)

Amend­ment I

[Free­dom of reli­gion, speech, of the press, and right of petition.]

Con­gress shall make no law respect­ing an estab­lish­ment of reli­gion, or pro­hibit­ing the free exer­cise thereof; or abridg­ing the free­dom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the peo­ple peace­ably to assem­ble, and to peti­tion the Gov­ern­ment for a redress of grievances.

Amend­ment II

[Right of peo­ple to bear arms not to be infringed.]

A well reg­u­lated mili­tia, being nec­es­sary to the secu­rity of a free State, the right of the peo­ple to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

Amend­ment III

[Quar­ter­ing of troops.]

No sol­dier shall, in time of peace be quar­tered in any house, with­out the con­sent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a man­ner to be pre­scribed by law.

Amend­ment IV

[Per­sons and houses to be secure from unrea­son­able searches and seizures.]

The right of the peo­ple to be secure in their per­sons, houses, papers, and effects, against unrea­son­able searches and seizures, shall not be vio­lated, and no war­rants shall issue, but upon prob­a­ble cause, sup­ported by oath or affir­ma­tion, and par­tic­u­larly describ­ing the place to be searched, and the per­sons or things to be seized.

Amend­ment V

[Tri­als for crimes; just com­pen­sa­tion for pri­vate prop­erty taken for pub­lic use.]

No per­son shall be held to answer for a cap­i­tal, or oth­er­wise infa­mous crime, unless on a pre­sent­ment or indict­ment of a Grand Jury, except in cases aris­ing in the land or naval forces, or in the mili­tia, when in actual ser­vice in time of war or pub­lic dan­ger; nor shall any per­son be sub­ject for the same offence to be twice put in jeop­ardy of life or limb; nor shall be com­pelled in any crim­i­nal case to be a wit­ness, against him­self, nor be deprived of life, lib­erty, or prop­erty, with­out due process of law; nor shall pri­vate prop­erty be taken for pub­lic use, with­out just compensation.

Amend­ment VI

[Civil rights in tri­als for crimes enumerated.]

In all crim­i­nal pros­e­cu­tions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and pub­lic trial, by an impar­tial jury of the State and dis­trict wherein the crime shall have been com­mit­ted, which dis­trict shall have been pre­vi­ously ascer­tained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accu­sa­tion; to be con­fronted with the wit­nesses against him; to have com­pul­sory process for obtain­ing wit­nesses in his favor, and to have the assis­tance of coun­sel for his defense.

Amend­ment VII

[Civil rights in civil suits.]

In suits at com­mon law, where the value in con­tro­versy shall exceed twenty dol­lars, the right of trial by jury shall be pre­served, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be oth­er­wise re-examined in any court of the United States, than accord­ing to the rules of the com­mon law.

Amend­ment VIII

[Exces­sive bail, fines, and pun­ish­ments prohibited.]

Exces­sive bail shall not be required, nor exces­sive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual pun­ish­ments inflicted.

Amend­ment IX

[Reserved rights of people.]

The enu­mer­a­tion in the Con­sti­tu­tion, of cer­tain rights, shall not be con­strued to deny or dis­par­age oth­ers retained by the people.

Amend­ment X

[Pow­ers not del­e­gated, reserved to states and peo­ple respectively.]

The pow­ers not del­e­gated to the United States by the Con­sti­tu­tion, nor pro­hib­ited by it to the States, are reserved to the States, respec­tively, or to the people.

Amend­ment XI

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Mar. 5, 1794, by the Third Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Feb. 7, 1795.)

[Judi­cial power of United States not to extend to suits against a state.]

The judi­cial power of the United States shall not be con­strued to extend to any suit in law or equity, com­menced or pros­e­cuted against one of the United States by cit­i­zens of another State, or by cit­i­zens or sub­jects of any for­eign state.

Amend­ment XII

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Dec. 12, 1803, by the Eighth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied July 27, 1804.)

[Present mode of elect­ing pres­i­dent and vice pres­i­dent by elec­tors.1]

The elec­tors shall meet in their respec­tive states, and vote by bal­lot for Pres­i­dent and Vice Pres­i­dent, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhab­i­tant of the same state with them­selves; they shall name in their bal­lots the per­son voted for as Pres­i­dent, and in dis­tinct bal­lots the per­son voted for as Vice Pres­i­dent, and they shall make dis­tinct lists of all per­sons voted for as Pres­i­dent, and of all per­sons voted for as Vice Pres­i­dent, and of the num­ber of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and cer­tify, and trans­mit sealed to the seat of the gov­ern­ment of the United States, directed to the Pres­i­dent of the Sen­ate; the Pres­i­dent of the Sen­ate shall, in the pres­ence of the Sen­ate and House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives, open all the cer­tifi­cates and the votes shall then be counted; the per­son hav­ing the great­est num­ber of votes for Pres­i­dent, shall be the Pres­i­dent, if such num­ber be a major­ity of the whole num­ber of elec­tors appointed; and if no per­son have such major­ity, then from the per­sons hav­ing the high­est num­bers not exceed­ing three on the list of those voted for as Pres­i­dent, the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives shall choose imme­di­ately, by bal­lot, the Pres­i­dent. But in choos­ing the Pres­i­dent, the votes shall be taken by states, the rep­re­sen­ta­tion from each State hav­ing one vote; a quo­rum for this pur­pose shall con­sist of a mem­ber or mem­bers from two thirds of the states, and a major­ity of all the states shall be nec­es­sary to a choice. And if the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives shall not choose a Pres­i­dent when­ever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next fol­low­ing, then the Vice Pres­i­dent shall act as Pres­i­dent, as in the case of the death or other con­sti­tu­tional dis­abil­ity of the Pres­i­dent. The per­son hav­ing the great­est num­ber of votes as Vice Pres­i­dent, shall be the Vice Pres­i­dent, if such num­ber be a major­ity of the whole num­ber of elec­tors appointed, and if no per­son have a major­ity, then from the two high­est num­bers on the list, the Sen­ate shall choose the Vice Pres­i­dent; a quo­rum for the pur­pose shall con­sist of two thirds of the whole num­ber of Sen­a­tors, and a major­ity of the whole num­ber shall be nec­es­sary to a choice. But no per­son con­sti­tu­tion­ally inel­i­gi­ble to the office of Pres­i­dent shall be eli­gi­ble to that of Vice Pres­i­dent of the United States.

Amend­ment XIII

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Feb. 1, 1865, by the Thirty-eighth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Dec. 6, 1865.)

Sec­tion 1

[Slav­ery prohibited.]

Nei­ther slav­ery nor invol­un­tary servi­tude, except as a pun­ish­ment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly con­victed, shall exist within the United States, or any place sub­ject to their jurisdiction.

Sec­tion 2

[Con­gress given power to enforce this article.]

Con­gress shall have power to enforce this arti­cle by appro­pri­ate legislation.

Amend­ment XIV

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states June 16, 1866, by the Thirty-ninth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied July 9, 1868.)

Sec­tion 1

[Cit­i­zen­ship defined; priv­i­leges of citizens.]

All per­sons born or nat­u­ral­ized in the United States, and sub­ject to the juris­dic­tion thereof, are cit­i­zens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the priv­i­leges or immu­ni­ties of cit­i­zens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any per­son of life, lib­erty, or prop­erty, with­out due process of law; nor deny to any per­son within its juris­dic­tion the equal pro­tec­tion of the laws.

Sec­tion 2

[Appor­tion­ment of Representatives.]

Rep­re­sen­ta­tives shall be appor­tioned among the sev­eral States accord­ing to their respec­tive num­bers, count­ing the whole num­ber of per­sons in each State, exclud­ing Indi­ans not taxed. But when the right to vote at any elec­tion for the choice of elec­tors for Pres­i­dent and Vice Pres­i­dent of the United States, Rep­re­sen­ta­tives in Con­gress, the exec­u­tive and judi­cial offi­cers of a State, or the mem­bers of the Leg­is­la­ture thereof, is denied to any of the male inhab­i­tants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and cit­i­zens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for par­tic­i­pa­tion in rebel­lion, or other crime, the basis of rep­re­sen­ta­tion therein shall be reduced in the pro­por­tion which the num­ber of such male cit­i­zens shall bear to the whole num­ber of male cit­i­zens twenty-one years of age in such State.

Sec­tion 3

[Dis­qual­i­fi­ca­tion for office; removal of disability.]

No per­son shall be a Sen­a­tor or Rep­re­sen­ta­tive in Con­gress, or elec­tor of Pres­i­dent and Vice Pres­i­dent, or hold any office, civil or mil­i­tary, under the United States, or under any State, who, hav­ing pre­vi­ously taken an oath, as a mem­ber of Con­gress, or as an offi­cer of the United States, or as a mem­ber of any State Leg­is­la­ture, or as an exec­u­tive or judi­cial offi­cer of any State, to sup­port the Con­sti­tu­tion of the United States, shall have engaged in insur­rec­tion or rebel­lion against the same, or given aid or com­fort to the ene­mies thereof. But Con­gress may, by a vote of two thirds of each House, remove such disability.

Sec­tion 4

[Pub­lic debt not to be ques­tioned; pay­ment of debts and claims incurred in aid of rebel­lion forbidden.]

The valid­ity of the pub­lic debt of the United States, autho­rized by law, includ­ing debts incurred for pay­ment of pen­sions and boun­ties for ser­vices in sup­press­ing insur­rec­tion or rebel­lion, shall not be ques­tioned. But nei­ther the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or oblig­a­tion incurred in aid of insur­rec­tion or rebel­lion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or eman­ci­pa­tion of any slave; but all such debts, oblig­a­tions, and claims shall be held ille­gal and void.

Sec­tion 5

[Con­gress given power to enforce this article.]

The Con­gress shall have power to enforce, by appro­pri­ate leg­is­la­tion, the pro­vi­sions of this article.

Amend­ment XV

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Feb. 27, 1869, by the For­ti­eth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Feb. 3, 1870.)

Sec­tion 1

[Right of cer­tain cit­i­zens to vote established.]

The right of cit­i­zens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or pre­vi­ous con­di­tion of servitude.

Sec­tion 2

[Con­gress given power to enforce this article.]

The Con­gress shall have power to enforce this arti­cle by appro­pri­ate legislation.

Amend­ment XVI

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states July 12, 1909, by the Sixty-first Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Feb. 3, 1913.)

[Taxes on income; Con­gress given power to lay and collect.]

The Con­gress shall have power to lay and col­lect taxes on incomes, from what­ever source derived, with­out appor­tion­ment among the sev­eral States, and with­out regard to any cen­sus or enumeration.

Amend­ment XVII

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states May 16, 1912, by the Sixty-second Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied April 8, 1913.)

[Elec­tion of U.S. sen­a­tors; fill­ing of vacan­cies; qual­i­fi­ca­tions of electors.]

The Sen­ate of the United States shall be com­posed of two Sen­a­tors from each State, elected by the peo­ple thereof, for six years; and each Sen­a­tor shall have one vote. The elec­tors in each State shall have the qual­i­fi­ca­tions req­ui­site for elec­tors of the most numer­ous branch of the State Legislatures.

When vacan­cies hap­pen in the rep­re­sen­ta­tion of any State in the Sen­ate, the exec­u­tive author­ity of such State shall issue writs of elec­tion to fill such vacan­cies: Pro­vided, that the leg­is­la­ture of any State may empower the exec­u­tive thereof to make tem­po­rary appoint­ment until the peo­ple fill the vacan­cies by elec­tion as the leg­is­la­ture may direct.

This amend­ment shall not be so con­strued as to affect the elec­tion or term of any Sen­a­tor cho­sen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution.

Amend­ment XVIII2

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Dec. 18, 1917, by the Sixty-fifth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied by three quar­ters of the states by Jan. 16, 1919, and became effec­tive Jan. 16, 1920.)

2. Repealed by the 21st Amendment.

Sec­tion 1

[Man­u­fac­ture, sale, or trans­porta­tion of intox­i­cat­ing liquors, for bev­er­age pur­poses, prohibited.]

After one year from the rat­i­fi­ca­tion of this arti­cle the man­u­fac­ture, sale, or trans­porta­tion of intox­i­cat­ing liquors within, the impor­ta­tion thereof into, or the expor­ta­tion thereof from the United States and all ter­ri­tory sub­ject to the juris­dic­tion thereof for bev­er­age pur­poses is hereby prohibited.

Sec­tion 2

[Con­gress and the sev­eral states given con­cur­rent power to pass appro­pri­ate leg­is­la­tion to enforce this article.]

The Con­gress and the sev­eral States shall have con­cur­rent power to enforce this arti­cle by appro­pri­ate legislation.

Sec­tion 3

[Pro­vi­sions of arti­cle to become oper­a­tive, when adopted by three fourths of the states.]

This arti­cle shall be inop­er­a­tive unless it shall have been rat­i­fied as an amend­ment to the Con­sti­tu­tion by the leg­is­la­tures of the sev­eral States, as pro­vided in the Con­sti­tu­tion, within seven years from the date of the sub­mis­sion hereof to the States by Congress.

Amend­ment XIX

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states June 4, 1919, by the Sixty-sixth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Aug. 18, 1920.)

[The right of cit­i­zens to vote shall not be denied because of sex.]

The right of cit­i­zens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

[Con­gress given power to enforce this article.]

Con­gress shall have power to enforce this arti­cle by appro­pri­ate legislation.

Amend­ment XX

(The pro­posed amend­ment, some­times called the “Lame Duck Amend­ment,” was sent to the states Mar. 3, 1932, by the Seventy-second Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Jan. 23, 1933; but, in accor­dance with Sec­tion 5, Sec­tions 1 and 2 did not go into effect until Oct. 15, 1933.)

Sec­tion 1

[Terms of pres­i­dent, vice pres­i­dent, sen­a­tors, and representatives.]

The terms of the Pres­i­dent and Vice Pres­i­dent shall end at noon on the twen­ti­eth day of Jan­u­ary, and the terms of Sen­a­tors and Rep­re­sen­ta­tives at noon on the third day of Jan­u­ary, of the years in which such terms would have ended if this arti­cle had not been rat­i­fied; and the terms of their suc­ces­sors shall then begin.

Sec­tion 2

[Time of assem­bling Congress.]

The Con­gress shall assem­ble at least once in every year, and such meet­ing shall begin at noon on the third day of Jan­u­ary, unless they shall by law appoint a dif­fer­ent day.

Sec­tion 3

[Fill­ing vacancy in office of president.]

If, at the time fixed for the begin­ning of the term of the Pres­i­dent, the President-elect shall have died, the Vice President-elect shall become Pres­i­dent. If a Pres­i­dent shall not have been cho­sen before the time fixed for the begin­ning of his term, or if the President-elect shall have failed to qual­ify, then the Vice Pres­i­dent shall have qual­i­fied; and the Con­gress may by law pro­vide for the case wherein nei­ther a President-elect nor a Vice President-elect shall have qual­i­fied, declar­ing who shall then act as Pres­i­dent, or the man­ner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such per­son shall act accord­ingly until a Pres­i­dent or Vice Pres­i­dent shall have qualified.

Sec­tion 4

[Power of Con­gress in pres­i­den­tial succession.]

The Con­gress may by law pro­vide for the case of the death of any of the per­sons from whom the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives may choose a Pres­i­dent when­ever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the per­sons from whom the Sen­ate may choose a Vice Pres­i­dent when­ever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them.

Sec­tion 5

[Time of tak­ing effect.]

Sec­tions 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of Octo­ber fol­low­ing the rat­i­fi­ca­tion of this article.

Sec­tion 6

[Rat­i­fi­ca­tion.]

This arti­cle shall be inop­er­a­tive unless it shall have been rat­i­fied as an amend­ment to the Con­sti­tu­tion by the leg­is­la­tures of three fourths of the sev­eral States within seven years from the date of its submission.

Amend­ment XXI

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Feb. 20, 1933, by the Seventy-second Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Dec. 5, 1933.)

Sec­tion 1

[Repeal of Pro­hi­bi­tion Amendment.]

The eigh­teenth arti­cle of amend­ment to the Con­sti­tu­tion of the United States is hereby repealed.

Sec­tion 2

[Trans­porta­tion of intox­i­cat­ing liquors.]

The trans­porta­tion or impor­ta­tion into any State, ter­ri­tory, or pos­ses­sion of the United States for deliv­ery or use therein of intox­i­cat­ing liquors, in vio­la­tion of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited.

Sec­tion 3

[Rat­i­fi­ca­tion.]

This arti­cle shall be inop­er­a­tive unless it shall have been rat­i­fied as an amend­ment to the Con­sti­tu­tion by con­ven­tion in the sev­eral States, as pro­vided in the Con­sti­tu­tion, within seven years from the date of the sub­mis­sion thereof to the States by the Congress.

Amend­ment XXII

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Mar. 21, 1947, by the Eight­i­eth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Feb. 27, 1951.)

Sec­tion 1

[Limit to num­ber of terms a pres­i­dent may serve.]

No per­son shall be elected to the office of the Pres­i­dent more than twice, and no per­son who has held the office of Pres­i­dent, or acted as Pres­i­dent, for more than two years of a term to which some other per­son was elected Pres­i­dent shall be elected to the office of the Pres­i­dent more than once. But this arti­cle shall not apply to any per­son hold­ing the office of Pres­i­dent when this arti­cle was pro­posed by the Con­gress, and shall not pre­vent any per­son who may be hold­ing the office of Pres­i­dent, or act­ing as Pres­i­dent, dur­ing the term within which this arti­cle becomes oper­a­tive from hold­ing the office of Pres­i­dent or act­ing as Pres­i­dent dur­ing the remain­der of such term.

Sec­tion 2

[Rat­i­fi­ca­tion.]

This arti­cle shall be inop­er­a­tive unless it shall have been rat­i­fied as an amend­ment to the Con­sti­tu­tion by the leg­is­la­tures of three fourths of the sev­eral States within seven years from the date of its sub­mis­sion to the States by the Congress.

Amend­ment XXIII

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states June 16, 1960, by the Eighty-sixth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied March 29, 1961.)

Sec­tion 1

[Elec­tors for the Dis­trict of Columbia.]

The Dis­trict con­sti­tut­ing the seat of Gov­ern­ment of the United States shall appoint in such man­ner as the Con­gress may direct: A num­ber of elec­tors of Pres­i­dent and Vice Pres­i­dent equal to the whole num­ber of Sen­a­tors and Rep­re­sen­ta­tives in Con­gress to which the Dis­trict would be enti­tled if it were a State, but in no event more than the least pop­u­lous State; they shall be in addi­tion to those appointed by the States, but they shall be con­sid­ered, for the pur­poses of the elec­tion of Pres­i­dent and Vice Pres­i­dent, to be elec­tors appointed by a State; and they shall meet in the Dis­trict and per­form such duties as pro­vided by the twelfth arti­cle of amendment.

Sec­tion 2

[Con­gress given power to enforce this article.]

The Con­gress shall have the power to enforce this arti­cle by appro­pri­ate legislation.

Amend­ment XXIV

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Aug. 27, 1962, by the Eighty-seventh Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Jan. 23, 1964.)

Sec­tion 1

[Pay­ment of poll tax or other taxes not to be pre­req­ui­site for vot­ing in fed­eral elections.]

The right of cit­i­zens of the United States to vote in any pri­mary or other elec­tion for Pres­i­dent or Vice Pres­i­dent, for elec­tors for Pres­i­dent or Vice Pres­i­dent, or for Sen­a­tor or Rep­re­sen­ta­tive in Con­gress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by rea­sons of fail­ure to pay any poll tax or other tax.

Sec­tion 2

[Con­gress given power to enforce this article.]

The Con­gress shall have the power to enforce this arti­cle by appro­pri­ate legislation.

Amend­ment XXV

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states July 6, 1965, by the Eighty-ninth Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied Feb. 10, 1967.)

Sec­tion 1

[Suc­ces­sion of vice pres­i­dent to presidency.]

In case of the removal of the Pres­i­dent from office or of his death or res­ig­na­tion, the Vice Pres­i­dent shall become President.

Sec­tion 2

[Vacancy in office of vice president.]

When­ever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice Pres­i­dent, the Pres­i­dent shall nom­i­nate a Vice Pres­i­dent who shall take office upon con­fir­ma­tion by a major­ity vote of both Houses of Congress.

Sec­tion 3

[Vice pres­i­dent as act­ing president.]

When­ever the Pres­i­dent trans­mits to the Pres­i­dent pro tem­pore of the Sen­ate and the Speaker of the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives his writ­ten dec­la­ra­tion that he is unable to dis­charge the pow­ers and duties of his office, and until he trans­mits to them a writ­ten dec­la­ra­tion to the con­trary, such pow­ers and duties shall be dis­charged by the Vice Pres­i­dent as Act­ing President.

Sec­tion 4

[Vice pres­i­dent as act­ing president.]

When­ever the Vice Pres­i­dent and a major­ity of either the prin­ci­pal offi­cers of the exec­u­tive depart­ments or of such other body as Con­gress may by law pro­vide, trans­mit to the Pres­i­dent pro tem­pore of the Sen­ate and the Speaker of the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives their writ­ten dec­la­ra­tion that the Pres­i­dent is unable to dis­charge the pow­ers and duties of his office, the Vice Pres­i­dent shall imme­di­ately assume the pow­ers and duties of the office as Act­ing President.

There­after, when the Pres­i­dent trans­mits to the Pres­i­dent pro tem­pore of the Sen­ate and the Speaker of the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives his writ­ten dec­la­ra­tion that no inabil­ity exists, he shall resume the pow­ers and duties of his office unless the Vice Pres­i­dent and a major­ity of either the prin­ci­pal offi­cers of the exec­u­tive depart­ment or of such other body as Con­gress may by law pro­vide, trans­mit within four days to the Pres­i­dent pro tem­pore of the Sen­ate and the Speaker of the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives their writ­ten dec­la­ra­tion that the Pres­i­dent is unable to dis­charge the pow­ers and duties of his office. There­upon Con­gress shall decide the issue, assem­bling within forty-eight hours for that pur­pose if not in ses­sion. If the Con­gress, within twenty-one days after receipt of the lat­ter writ­ten dec­la­ra­tion, or, if Con­gress is not in ses­sion, within twenty-one days after Con­gress is required to assem­ble, deter­mines by two thirds vote of both Houses that the Pres­i­dent is unable to dis­charge the pow­ers and duties of his office, the Vice Pres­i­dent shall con­tinue to dis­charge the same as Act­ing Pres­i­dent; oth­er­wise, the Pres­i­dent shall resume the pow­ers and duties of his office.

Amend­ment XXVI

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Mar. 23, 1971, by the Ninety-second Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied July 1, 1971.)

Sec­tion 1

[Vot­ing for 18-year-olds.]

The right of cit­i­zens of the United States, who are 18 years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of age.

Sec­tion 2

[Con­gress given power to enforce this article.]

The Con­gress shall have power to enforce this arti­cle by appro­pri­ate legislation.

Amend­ment XXVII

(The pro­posed amend­ment was sent to the states Sept. 25, 1789, by the First Con­gress. It was rat­i­fied May 7, 1992.)

[Con­gres­sional raises.]

No law, vary­ing the com­pen­sa­tion for the ser­vices of the Sen­a­tors and Rep­re­sen­ta­tives, shall take effect, until an elec­tion of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives shall have intervened.


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